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Oud 18 August 2006, 19:52  
BigMaus
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Origineel gepost door Markywannabee Bekijk Post
je zegt zware training
is dat omdat je dan veel verontreinigde lucht inademd of andere rede?
Nee de dingen die ik hier noem moet je ff apart van elkaar zien.
Het zijn dingen die slecht KUNNEN zijn.
Vrije radicalen moet je gewoon domweg bestrijden...en dat gebeurt met anti-oxidanten.

 
Oud 18 August 2006, 19:56  
Little Me
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Wrestling deaths and steroids

Steroids played a role in the deaths of several pro wrestlers since 1997, according to medical examiners, family members and the wrestlers themselves, including:

• Curt Hennig, 44, died of acute cocaine intoxication in February 2003, medical records show. But his father said last year that a lethal combination of steroids and painkillers contributed to his death.

•"The British Bulldog," Davey Boy Smith, 39,died in 2002 in Canada of an enlarged heart with evidence of microscopic scar tissue, possibly from steroid abuse, a coroner said. "Davey paid the price with steroid cocktails and human-growth hormones," says Bruce Hart, a veteran trainer who worked with Smith and was his brother-in-law.

•Louie "Spicolli" Mucciolo, 27, died from coronary disease in his San Pedro, Calif., home in 1998, according to his autopsy. Investigators found an empty vial of the male hormone testosterone, pain pills and an anxiety-reducing drug. The Los Angeles County coroner's office determined the drugs might have contributed to his heart condition.

•Richard "Ravishing Rick Rude" Rood, 40, died from an overdose of "mixed medications" in Alpharetta, Ga., in 1999, his autopsy shows. In 1994 he testified that he had used anabolic steroids to build muscle mass and relieve joint pain.

•"Flyin' "Brian Pillman, 35, was taking painkillers and human-growth hormones when he died from heart disease in 1997, his widow said several years ago. Investigators found empty bottles of painkillers near his body in a Minnesota hotel room.
More to come
 
Oud 18 August 2006, 19:59  
Little Me
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Wrestling's Dirty Secrets :

While many people think of wrestling as a big joke, there is one thing about wrestling that isn't funny. The death rate among wrestlers is alarmingly high. The only time this story was covered by the national media was on HBO's Real Sports with Bryant Gumble. That segment features the only man that can do something about the problem, Vince McMahon, mocking the interviewer and slapping the notes from his hands. In addition, the only wrestler to speak up for the wrestlers, Roddy Piper, was fired after the piece aired.

Drug Usage

While the outcomes of the matches are pre-determined, the effort to put on those matches takes a huge toll on their bodies. The wrestlers are on the road over 300 days a year and unlike other athletes, they do not have an off season.

In addition, accidents do happen and injuries occur. Unfortunately, if wrestlers take time off, their wallets will suffer significantly. These factors all lead to the deadly slope that many wrestlers have found themselves facing. They get addicted to pain killers to numb the pain. This medicine keeps them too lethargic to wrestle, so they take drugs to get high. This deadly mixture leads to illegal drug dependency that many wrestlers have to cope with even after they retire.

Large Bodies

In the 90's, the WWE faced a major steroid scandal. While they claim to test for steroids, it is obvious to the casual viewer that many of the wrestlers are taking something to get their physiques to look like they do. In today's environment, a wrestler must carry either an enormous amount of muscle or a tremendous amount of fat to give him the larger than life size needed to be successful in the business. That extra weight, whether muscle or fat, makes the heart work harder than it must.

Accidents and Old Age

Not all the wrestlers die due to the reasons stated above. Some die due to travel related incidents because of all the time on the road. Some have even died as a result of injuries suffered in the ring. Unfortunately, the least common way that wrestlers seem to be dying is due to old age.

How bad is the problem?

The list below only includes wrestlers that have appeared on national TV and were stars. Imagine if this many baseball players died at such an early age. There would be congressional hearings. Yet because it is wrestlers, no one cares. The one man that should care once interviewed a widow the night after her husband died and asked her on live TV how she planned to support her children.

Famous Wrestlers That Have Died Since 1985 Before the Age of 65

Chris Von Erich - 21
Mike Von Erich - 23
The Renegade - 23
Louie Spiccoli - 27
Art Barr - 28
Gino Hernandez - 29
Jay Youngblood - 30
Rick McGraw - 30
Joey Marella - 30
Ed Gatner - 31
Buzz Sawyer - 32
Crash Holly - 32
Kerry Von Erich - 33
D.J. Peterson - 33
Eddie Gilbert - 33
Owen Hart - 33
Chris Candido - 33
Adrian Adonis - 34
Gary Albright - 34
Bobby Duncum Jr. - 34
Yokozuna - 34
Big Dick Dudley - 34
Brian Pillman - 35
Marianna Komlos - 35
Pitbull #2 - 36
The Wall/Malice - 36
Leroy Brown - 38
Mark Curtis - 38
Eddie Guerrero - 38
Davey Boy Smith - 39
Johnny Grunge - 39
Vivian Vachon - 40
Jeep Swenson - 40
Brady Boone - 40
Terry Gordy - 40
Bertha Faye - 40
Billy Joe Travis - 40
Larry Cameron - 41
Rick Rude - 41
Randy Anderson - 41
Bruiser Brody - 42
Miss Elizabeth - 42
Big Boss Man - 42
Earthquake - 42
Ray Candy - 43
Dino Bravo - 44
Curt Hennig - 44
Jerry Blackwell - 45
Junkyard Dog - 45
Hercules - 45
Andre The Giant - 46
Big John Studd - 46
Chris Adams - 46
Mike Davis - 46
Hawk - 46
Dick Murdoch - 49
Jumbo Tsuruta - 49
Rocco Rock - 49
Moondog Spot - 51
Ken Timbs - 53
Uncle Elmer - 54
Pez Whatley - 54
Eddie Graham - 55
Tarzan Tyler - 55
Haystacks Calhoun- 55
Giant Haystacks - 55
The Spoiler - 56
Kurt Von Hess - 56
Moondog King - 56
Gene Anderson - 58
Dr. Jerry Graham - 58
Bulldog Brown - 58
Tony Parisi - 58
Rufus R. Jones - 60
Ray Stevens - 60
Stan Stasiak - 60
Terry Garvin - 60
Boris Malenko - 61
Little Beaver - 61
Sapphire - 61
Shohei Baba - 61
Dick the Bruiser - 62
Wilbur Snyder - 62
George Cannon - 62
Karl Krupp - 62
Dale Lewis - 62
Gorilla Monsoon - 62
Hiro Matsuda - 62
Bulldog Brower - 63
Wahoo McDaniel - 63
Maybe more to come
 
Oud 18 August 2006, 20:10  
Little Me
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High death rate lingers behind fun facade of pro wrestling

By Jon Swartz, USA TODAY

Mike "Road Warrior Hawk" Hegstrand died from an enlarged heart caused by high blood pressure at 46. Mike "Crash Holly" Lockwood died from what a medical examiner ruled a suicide at 32. A lethal combination of painkillers was found in his system.

Former pro wrestler Del Wilkes shed his mask after a career that lasted 12 years.


Mike Lozanski died from what his family says was a lung infection at 35. His relatives are awaiting an autopsy report.

All died in the last five months. All were professional wrestlers with bulging muscles on sculpted bodies. The deaths received little notice beyond obituaries in small newspapers and on wrestling Web sites, typical of the fringe status of the $500 million industry.

Yet their deaths underscore the troubling fact that despite some attempts to clean up an industry sold on size, stamina and theatrics, wrestlers die young at a staggering rate. Since 1997, about 1,000 wrestlers 45 and younger have worked on pro wrestling circuits worldwide, wrestling officials estimate.

USA TODAY's examination of medical documents, autopsies and police reports, along with interviews with family members and news accounts, shows that at least 65 wrestlers died in that time, 25 from heart attacks or other coronary problems — an extraordinarily high rate for people that young, medical officials say. Many had enlarged hearts.

Illegal steroid use in professional sports has gained plenty of attention: President Bush in his State of the Union address in January urged athletes and professional sports leagues to stop steroid use, and a federal grand jury has been investigating Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative.

However, it is pro wrestling where the problem appears to be the most pervasive and deadly. In five of the 25 deaths, medical examiners concluded that steroids might have played a role. Excessive steroid use can lead to an enlarged heart. In 12 others, examiners in medical reports cited evidence of use of painkillers, cocaine and other drugs.

The widespread use of drugs and the deaths associated with it raise questions about a largely unregulated business that is watched on TV and in arenas by an estimated 20 million fans a week, including children. Those fans will tune in Sunday for the industry's biggest event, WrestleMania XX.

Fifteen current and former wrestlers interviewed by USA TODAY say they willingly bulked up on anabolic steroids, which they call "juice," to look the part and took pain pills so they could perform four to five nights a week despite injuries. Some admit to use of human-growth hormones, a muscle-building compound even more powerful and dangerous than steroids. And many say they used recreational drugs.

"I experienced what we in the profession call the silent scream" of pain, drugs and loneliness, says wrestling legend "Rowdy" Roddy Piper, 49, who has been in the business more than 30 years. "You're in your hotel room. You're banged up, numb and alone. You don't want to go downstairs to the bar or restaurant. The walls are breathing. You don't want to talk. Panic sets in and you start weeping. It's something all of us go through."

Scott "Raven" Levy, 39, says he used steroids and more than 200 pain pills daily before he kicked the habit a few years ago. "It's part of the job," Levy says. "If you want to be a wrestler, you have to be a big guy, and you have to perform in pain. If you choose to do neither, pick another profession."

The costs are high. Wrestlers have death rates about seven times higher than the general U.S. population, says Keith Pinckard, a medical examiner in Dallas who has followed wrestling fatalities. They are 12 times more likely to die from heart disease than other Americans 25 to 44, he adds. And USA TODAY research shows that wrestlers are about 20 times more likely to die before 45 than are pro football players, another profession that's exceptionally hard on the body.

Some wrestlers bet among themselves on who will die next, says Mike Lano, a former wrestling manager and promoter.

Steroids-ingrained culture

Unlike amateur wrestling, which is a competitive sport in high school and college, pro wrestling combines sports, stunts and storytelling. The results are scripted.

Pro wrestling does not test for performance-enhancing drugs such as steroids. Nor are they banned by wrestling organizations as they are in pro football, basketball and baseball.

That is one reason, wrestlers and industry watchers say, that use of steroids and other drugs in pro wrestling has gone largely unchecked. It also has been ingrained in the culture for decades. Several of wrestling's biggest names, including Hulk Hogan and former Minnesota governor Jesse "The Body" Ventura, years ago acknowledged using bodybuilding drugs.

"There was a joke: If you did not test positive for steroids, you were fired," former wrestler and broadcaster Bruno Sammartino told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch in 1991.

"That's a cop-out," says Vince McMahon, head of wrestling's biggest organization, World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). "These guys took steroids because they wanted to.



Del Wilkes, during his stint with the WWF wrestling as "The Patriot."


"Because we are the most visible organization, we get the black eye," adds McMahon, noting that only two of the 65 deceased wrestlers died while working for his company. "It is alarming whenever young people pass away from these insidious causes, but you can't help someone if they don't want to help themselves."

Piper says he lived on a steady diet of muscle builders and painkillers for more than two decades.

The amateur boxer and wrestler left home in Canada at 13. A promoter noticed his "mean streak" and paid him $25 to fight the legendary Larry "The Axe" Hennig in Winnipeg. Piper made a lasting impression with his entrance: Clad in a kilt, he ambled to the ring as his bagpipe band played. Hennig pinned the 15-year-old in 10 seconds, the shortest of Piper's 7,000 matches, but Piper quickly was assigned to shows in Kansas City, Montreal and Texas.

Soon Piper had become one of the industry's best-known villains. By the mid-1980s, he was the foil to Hogan, the WWF's golden boy. Wrestling had become a pop-culture phenomenon. Both moonlighted as movie and TV stars, had their own action figures and hobnobbed with celebrities.

Even so, Piper never forgot what he heard as a penniless teenager. "A promoter said to me, 'If you die, kid, die in the ring. It's good for business.' "

A 'rock god' lifestyle

Despite, or because of, its testosterone-fueled danger, wrestling attracts mostly young men to a circuslike life built on outsized personalities, "ripped" bodies and death-defying stunts. Newcomers dive headfirst into the rough-and-tumble profession. Current and former wrestlers interviewed say they live on the edge and see few career options. Only a handful of stars have more than a high school education. During a typical 15-minute match, combatants exchange choreographed body slams and punches. Some leap from top ropes onto cement surfaces outside the ring.

In more physical "hard-core" matches, wrestlers are smashed through tables, whacked in the head with steel chairs and punctured with barbed wire and tacks. Those antics are not fake. "Wrestling is coïtus, drugs and rock 'n' roll because we have a rock god kind of thing going," Levy says.

Top performers make more than $1 million annually. Millions of youngsters pine to become the next Mick Foley. He parlayed death-defying stunts — he plunged more than 20 feet from steel cages and was frequently bloodied — into a multimillion-dollar wrestling career. He has since written books on wrestling that made the USA TODAY best-seller list.

But for every star, scores of others toil in obscurity at run-down gyms. "Strongman" Johnny Perry, 30, who died of cocaine intoxication in North Carolina in 2002, moonlighted as a repo man. Curtis Parker, 28, accidentally killed in practice in St. Louis in 2002, also worked at a Jack in the Box.

Some, like Hegstrand, fade from being headliners at sold-out football stadiums — as he was in the early and mid-1990s — to performing at high school gyms and armories. For nearly two decades, Hegstrand — a hulking figure with wrecking-ball biceps who died in October — freely admitted he indulged in hard living. Though he didn't specify what he took, he made it clear that pro wrestling was fraught with steroids, pain pills and recreational drugs. Then came the sobering news: Years of excess had created a tear in his heart.

"I'd put just about everything (drugs) in me that was humanly possible during my wrestling career," Hegstrand told wrestling radio talk-show host Lano in April 2003.

Hegstrand spent his last few years barnstorming in wrestler-turned-evangelist Ted DiBiase's "Heart of David Ministry" promotion. When he died, traces of marijuana were found in his body, according to his autopsy report.

Others, like Lozanski, wrestle despite serious injuries. More than 18 months after he took a nasty fall that damaged his lungs during a match, Lozanski traversed North America, wrestling for small promotions. He died unexpectedly in his sleep in December.

"That's the nature of the business," says Chris Lozanski, 31, Mike's brother and a former wrestler. "Mike felt he had to keep working. I left the business because I want to see my 11-month-old son grow up," he says.

Since he could walk, Lockwood wanted to be a wrestler. What the 5-foot-8 Lockwood lacked in height, he made up for in determination and tireless training, his mother, Barbara, says. "Everyone laughed when this kid said he would make it, but he did."

Lockwood won more than 20 titles in the WWE and a cult following from 1998 to 2003.

With fame came sacrifices. Lockwood was in constant pain and began using prescription painkillers 18 months ago. He also gained noticeable bulk and was irritable — two signs of steroid use. But when Barbara asked, her son denied using them.

Lockwood was released from his WWE contract after five years on July 1 because it did not have "further plans for his character," the WWE said in a statement.

He was about to move back to California, where he planned to reunite with his high school sweetheart and their 7-year-old daughter. He planned to perform in Japan and train young wrestlers. "He was on his way home, but he didn't make it," Barbara says. Lockwood died in November in Florida. He was 32. A medical examiner ruled it a suicide from an overdose of painkillers. But Barbara thinks it was an accident. "Mike had too much to live for," she says.

Wrestling on trial

When anabolic steroids were cast as a controlled substance in 1991, federal law made purchases and possession of them illegal except for medical purposes. Two grand jury investigations shortly thereafter resulted in admissions of steroid abuse by a handful of big wrestling names and the 1991 conviction of a urologist, George Zahorian of Harrisburg, Pa.

He was convicted of 12 counts of selling steroids and painkillers to a body builder and several WWF performers, including Piper (whose real name is Roderick Toombs) and Hogan (Terry Bollea).

"The doctor had shopping bags with our names on them that were filled with steroids and prescription drugs," Piper says.

Shortly thereafter McMahon was indicted. But he was acquitted of charges of conspiring to distribute steroids to wrestlers.

The probes led to stringent drug testing in the WWF, but only for a few years. A few stars were suspended for flunking tests. By late 1996 the program was scrapped because of the expense — and other wrestling organizations didn't test or were lax in enforcement, the WWF said at the time.

Jerry McDevitt, the outside legal counsel for McMahon's wrestling organization, contends testing "just doesn't work" because wrestlers can fake urine tests or use designer steroids that are undetectable. "Anybody who wants to beat it can beat it. The only ones who are caught are stupid," he says.

Last year, the WWE — the WWF changed its name to World Wrestling Entertainment after a copyright dispute with the World Wildlife Fund in 2002 — let go star performer Jeff Hardy for refusing to undergo drug rehab treatment. Within weeks, several wrestling organizations lined up to hire him.

Major promoters say the industry has moved on from its "Wild, Wild West" days of the late 1980s.

Young wrestlers take better care of themselves. "The new guys play PlayStation in their hotel rooms," wrestler Sean Waltman, 31, says.

WWE, the largest wrestling organization in North America with 125 wrestlers, says it tests for recreational drugs if there is probable cause. If a wrestler refuses rehab, he is booted. It has cut weekly performances to three or four, down from about five in the mid-1990s. And it has improved training techniques to minimize injuries.

"Steroids and painkillers (aren't) a professional choice but a lifestyle," says WWE wrestler John Cena, 26, who at 6-1 and 240 pounds is the size he was when he played college football. "I've learned to play in pain. If it's a serious enough injury, I take time off."

McMahon says he requires only that his wrestlers are in shape, not that they're "the size of monsters," as many were in the 1960s, '70s and '80s. "We're not looking for bodybuilders," he says.

The No. 2 wrestling employer, NWA-TNA, is considering mandatory drug testing. In November it began offering medical coverage for injuries inside and outside the ring to its 35 contracted wrestlers — the first time a pro wrestling organization has done so. It is considering medical and dental coverage.

But such reforms help only those wrestling for the top two organizations, leaving hundreds of wrestlers largely working under the same conditions as years ago.

Not much has changed on the regulatory front, either. Attempts by wrestlers to unionize have flopped. They have no player associations, as do football, basketball and baseball players.

In most states, oversight of pro wrestling is left to local athletic commissions. They usually have lenient prematch requirements. In New York, for example, performers are subject to little more than a blood-pressure test.

"No one is standing up. Either they don't know what's going on or they're terrified of being blacklisted," says wrestling journalist Dave Meltzer, echoing the sentiment of others.

For now the only one standing up seems to be Piper. He says he forfeited hundreds of thousands of dollars in potential earnings because his outspokenness about rampant steroid and drug use got him fired from the WWE in June.

The WWE denies Piper's allegations. It says the two were unable to negotiate a contract.

Piper doesn't allow any of his four children to watch wrestling — or harbor dreams of being a wrestler. He is sober, living on a 12 1/2-acre spread near Portland, Ore. He is hardly down on his luck. He's been in 26 movies, such as They Live, and TV's The Love Boat and The Mullets since 1978. He has agreed to appear in the movie Fish in a Barrel with Burt Reynolds.

Yet he clings to hopes of another big payday in wrestling. He suggests he and McMahon take their feud over Piper's dismissal to the airwaves.

"It would be great reality TV: two strong personalities going at it over a topical issue," he says, wistfully. "Maybe we could save lives in the process."
Nog een stukje over ...
 
Oud 18 August 2006, 20:12  
BigMaus
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Verdomme kerel, wat een lijst....zo jong!!
 
Oud 18 August 2006, 20:12  
Black Knight
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En dan al die boksers nog met hersenletsel vanwege het vaak knock-out gaan, wielrenners met hartproblemen en ga zo maar door.

Topsport is nu eenmaal niet gezond.
 
Oud 18 August 2006, 20:15  
Little Me
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By Todd Ganci

When I was cycling, I used to humor myself by asking "If steroids are so bad, where are the bodies?" At that time I didn't hear stories about too many people that had serious health problems or any that died from steroids. It turns out the problems take years to manifest and many die prematurely, in their 30's, 40's or 50's instead of their 60's, 70's or 80's. The following are but a few of the many:

Sonny Schmidt died at 46
Scott Klein died at 30
Ron Teufel died at 45
Dan Duchaine died at 48
Mohammed Benaziza died at 28
Andreas Munzer died at 30
Mike Mentzer died at 49
Ray Mentzer died at 47
Don Ross died at 55
Dr. John Tristany died
Don Peters died
Ray Raridon died
Steroid Health Risks

Dennis Newman (leukemia)
Orville Burke (coma)
Don Long (kidney failure)
Tom Prince (kidney failure)
Flex Wheeler (kidney transplant)
Tom Prince (kidney failure)
Ed Corney (stroke)
Boyer Coe (heart)
Danny Padilla (heart)
Pete Grymkowski (heart)
Mike Martarazzo 39 (triple bypass heart surgery)

The average US citizen lives to be 77.2 years old. The average citizen doesn't eat right or exercise enough, that's why the obesity rate is at the highest it's ever been. Athletes, especially bodybuilders eat great and exercise a lot. Why are so many dying 20, 30 or even 40 years sooner than the average couch potato?
Dit zijn dan weer BB
 
Oud 18 August 2006, 21:29  
jp79
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Tering wat een lijst!!! En wat ****ing jong... Een ding hadden de meeste gemeen het gebruik van aas. Veel hartproblemen trouwens. Je hart is natuurlijk ook een spier!!!
 
Oud 18 August 2006, 21:35  
flex170578
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Origineel gepost door jp79 Bekijk Post
Tering wat een lijst!!! En wat ****ing jong... Een ding hadden de meeste gemeen het gebruik van aas. Veel hartproblemen trouwens. Je hart is natuurlijk ook een spier!!!
De tikker is duidelijk de zwakke schakel van een bodybuilder!

Blijkbaar toch een aantal met nierproblemen ook, ik vraag me af of hier AAS de boosdoener zou zijn, veelvuldig gebruik van diuretica of een combi van beiden
 
Oud 18 August 2006, 21:39  
jp79
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Stats: M 34j
De kanker gevallen had ik een stuk hoger geschat maar deze zijn minimaal!!!
Zijn er nu members die na al dit nieuws minder gaan gebruiken of anders.
Ik zelf doe rustig aan met de 17aa varianten!!!
 
Oud 18 August 2006, 21:55  
Black Knight
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Origineel gepost door jp79 Bekijk Post
De kanker gevallen had ik een stuk hoger geschat maar deze zijn minimaal!!!
Zijn er nu members die na al dit nieuws minder gaan gebruiken of anders.
Ik zelf doe rustig aan met de 17aa varianten!!!
Zegt nog niets als je geen goed vergelijkingsmateriaal hebt. Je zult dan de gem. leeftijd van een roidgebruiker naast de gem. leeftijd van een inactief iemand moeten zetten oid.

Daarnaast zitten er ook al oudere BB's bij. Mogelijk zou hun leven met de huidige techniek gespaard kunnen blijven.

En de ene gebruiker is de andere niet, doseringen/duur verschillen ook enorm.
Kortom, er zijn veel te veel factoren mee gemoeid om er een goed oordeel over te kunnen vormen.
 
Oud 18 August 2006, 22:13  
axestream
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Origineel gepost door Little Me Bekijk Post
Over pro wrestlers is er een site denk ik . Daarin staan ze allemaal met leeftijd en oorzaak . Zijn wel geen BB maar toch ook een legue die zwaar anabolen snoepen . Zal die link is ff opzoeken .
En nog veel meer shit. Ze slikken er nog eens zware pijnstillers bij, slapen en eten slecht, veel drank, drugs....niet echt een lifestyle die vergelijkbaar is met die van bodybuilders.

Het is bij die gasten nog meer dan bij bodybuilding een combinatie van factoren. Als AAS gebruik de doorslaggevende factor zou zijn, dan zouden er onder de bodybuilders veel meer doden vallen, want die gebruiken meer roids.
 
Oud 18 August 2006, 22:22  
Glenn GX
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Origineel gepost door Little Me Bekijk Post
Dit zijn dan weer BB
Die lijst zegt niet veel en die conclusie klopt al helemaal niet.

Why are so many dying 20, 30 or even 40 years sooner than the average couch potato?

Many? Valt reuze mee.

Het probleem is dat je niet zeker ervan kan zijn dat het van AAS komt. En als het van AAS komt, weet je niet of het misbruik is geweest zoals bij Andreas Munzer. Diuretica speelt een grote rol en vooral erfelijke factoren.

En er staan ook namen op de lijst die niet relevant zijn zoals Orville Burke, dat is gewoon een ongeluk geweest tijdens operatie. Medische fout.
 
Oud 18 August 2006, 22:26  
Little Me
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Origineel gepost door Glenn GX Bekijk Post
Die lijst zegt niet veel en die conclusie klopt al helemaal niet.

Why are so many dying 20, 30 or even 40 years sooner than the average couch potato?

Many? Valt reuze mee.

Het probleem is dat je niet zeker ervan kan zijn dat het van AAS komt. En als het van AAS komt, weet je niet of het misbruik is geweest zoals bij Andreas Munzer. Diuretica speelt een grote rol en vooral erfelijke factoren.

En er staan ook namen op de lijst die niet relevant zijn zoals Orville Burke, dat is gewoon een ongeluk geweest tijdens operatie. Medische fout.
Ik hou het buiten al die verhalen om gewoon bij gezond verstand .

Trop is teveel , en dat is wel duidelijk denk ik .
 
Oud 18 August 2006, 23:15  
Bravo2
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Origineel gepost door axestream Bekijk Post
En nog veel meer shit. Ze slikken er nog eens zware pijnstillers bij, slapen en eten slecht, veel drank, drugs....niet echt een lifestyle die vergelijkbaar is met die van bodybuilders.

Het is bij die gasten nog meer dan bij bodybuilding een combinatie van factoren. Als AAS gebruik de doorslaggevende factor zou zijn, dan zouden er onder de bodybuilders veel meer doden vallen, want die gebruiken meer roids.
hmm ik denk dat je idd gelijk heb maar kan het ook niet zo zijn dat er gewoon doodleuk minder bodybuilders zijn.
 
Oud 18 August 2006, 23:21  
sysgod
Novice
 
Stats: M
Ik ken wel wat mensen die flinke hoeveelheden anabolen gebruikt hebben en vroeg overleden zijn,maar dat gebeurt ook bij mensen die nooit gebruikt hebben.Dus het is niet realistisch om daar een verband tussen te zien.
Ik las wel een artikel in een amerikaans bb magazine dat flex wheeler door overmatig gebruik voor de rest van zijn leven testosterone moet spuiten omdat zijn lichaam het zelf niet meer aanmaakt.
wat ik mij wel afvraag of dit op grotere schaal voorkomt,want ik denk dat ikzelf en veel anderen dit niet bekend zouden maken als je dit hebt.
zelf heb ik er overigens geen last van,maar ik heb maar een jaar of 5 twee tot drie kuurtjes per jaar genomen.
 
Oud 18 August 2006, 23:29  
lorso
Ripped Bodybuilder
 
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Stats: M 27j
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Kerry Von Erich 1960-1993 33, suicide
Chris Von Erich 1971-1991 20, suicide
Mike Von Erich 1964-1987 23, suicide
Fritz Von Erich 1929-1997 68, cancer
Gezellige familie
 
Oud 19 August 2006, 00:06  
redhead
Competitive Bodybuilder
 
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Je was er nog eentje vergeten

David Von Erich 1959-1984 25, overdose
 
Oud 19 August 2006, 01:58  
Glenn GX
Competitive Bodybuilder
 
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Bekijk Galerij (3 foto's)
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Origineel gepost door sysgod Bekijk Post
Ik ken wel wat mensen die flinke hoeveelheden anabolen gebruikt hebben en vroeg overleden zijn,maar dat gebeurt ook bij mensen die nooit gebruikt hebben.Dus het is niet realistisch om daar een verband tussen te zien.
Ik las wel een artikel in een amerikaans bb magazine dat flex wheeler door overmatig gebruik voor de rest van zijn leven testosteron moet spuiten omdat zijn lichaam het zelf niet meer aanmaakt.
wat ik mij wel afvraag of dit op grotere schaal voorkomt,want ik denk dat ikzelf en veel anderen dit niet bekend zouden maken als je dit hebt.
zelf heb ik er overigens geen last van,maar ik heb maar een jaar of 5 twee tot drie kuurtjes per jaar genomen.
HRT komt wel voor bij profbodybuilders. Milos Sarcev bv.
Ik vraag me af wat je nodig hebt om je axis kapot te spuiten.
 
Oud 19 August 2006, 02:13  
bob the builder
Dutch Bodybuilder
 
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"HARTSPIER JE BENT DE ZWAKSTE SCHAKEL" "TOT ZIENS"


dat er veel aan hartaanvallen overlijden verbaasd me eigenlijk niet.

mensen zijn van nature begrenst met groeien voor een goede reden.

het hele lichaam moet in evenwicht zijn .... als je dus een enorme biggie mofo wil worden moet je aas gebruiken.

aas zijn het middel om je doel mede te bereiken....

de doodsoorzaak is dus niet te wijten aan aas, maar aan het feit dat jij huge wil worden en dat ook geworden bent.


Je verhoogt dus je risico. Maar echt niet zo erg als gasten die de hele dag rokend voor de tv hangen met bier en ships.....

damn ik krijg trek...........

wel erg relaxed om zo die namen, mankementen e.d. eens bij elkaar te zien

NICE WORK
 
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